architecture
Clean Event-Driven Architecture
· β˜• 10 min read
Clean Architecture is a pretty bold statement and quite a hollow and opaque thing to say. I think of Clean Architecture as philosophy. It is not about the system today, but about the system today and tomorrow. More details inside

Event Sourcing: Events Evolution, Versioning, and Migration
· β˜• 12 min read
Systems do evolve and unavoidably evolution leads to breaking changes... If you are doing event sourcing, events evolution is unavoidable, ultimately you will crash πŸ”₯πŸš’ into it. The more you know, the better you prepared, as they say πŸ€“

Different Flavours of Events
· β˜• 15 min read
Events, events, events... Events are everywhere... Event Sourcing, Event Streaming, Asynchronous services and much more. All these technical contexts have something in common, but a lot is different. And this is what this article is about πŸ€“

Are Controllers Real Evil?
· β˜• 11 min read
Too often, I found myself with bloated Controllers. Or when Controllers seemed like an awkward and redundant solution. Anyhow I kept using them. I know I'm not the only one who trapped in a similar situation? Is it Controllers or us doing something wrong? Here I tried to shed a bit of light on this topic.

Server-side Redux. Part III. The Code.
· β˜• 13 min read
The State Management Goes Wild his is the final article of the series where we explore Redux and its boundaries. In the previous articles, weΒ first dived into the main principles of the Redux, then weΒ tried to move things aroundΒ and conceptually move Redux from one side to another. This article is all about hands-on experience, and by the end of it, we will have a working application that will follow the design we settled before.

Server-side Redux. Part II. The Design.
· β˜• 7 min read
The State Management Goes Wild This is the second article of the series where we will try to find out if there’s a place for Redux on the other side of the fence. Even though this series is base on the assumption that you are more or less familiar with what is Redux, don’t worry if not, as we covered all necessary concepts in the previous article. Take your time and make yourself comfortable with Redux.

Server-side Redux. Part I. The Redux.
· β˜• 7 min read
The State Management Goes Wild This is the first article of the series where we will try to find out if there’s a place for Redux on the other side of the fence. Even though this series is base on the assumption that you are more or less familiar with the Redux, but don’t worry if not, as we will go over necessary concepts first. Once we are confident with the Redux as a React state manager, we will be exploring how we can use it as a back-end state management and state distribution tool and gradually build the conceptual design.

CQRS: Querying via HTTP
· β˜• 8 min read
This article continues the series dedicated to the CQRS pattern. We will be looking at the Command Query Responsibility Segregation pattern as an architecture, particularly dive into the Querying part and try to find out how to fit it in the HTTP. At the time this article is written, two main protocol versions exist HTTP/1.1 and HTTP/2. Version 3.0 is in the draft, so we are not considering it. The main difference between 1.

CQRS: Commanding via HTTP
· β˜• 9 min read
This article starts the series dedicated to CQRS on top of HTTP. We will be looking at the Command Query Responsibility Segregation pattern as an architecture, particularly dive into the Commanding part and try to find out how to fit it in the HTTP. At the time this article is written, two main protocol versions exist HTTP/1.1 and HTTP/2. Version 3.0 is in the draft, so we are not taking it into consideration.

CQRS: Intro
· β˜• 7 min read
Command Query Responsibility Segregation This pattern gains popularity lately. And there’re certain benefits of using it as well as drawbacks. I would like to share my own experiences and thoughts on this topic. ℹ️ Don’t forget to check out more advanced series dedicated to appliying CQRS architectural patter on top of HTTP [CQRS via HTTP]. The series covers in depth main actors of the pattern, such as Commanding and Querying, as well as how do they fit in the HTTP.